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Avoid advice from non-writer friends

Advice Help Support And Tips Signpost Showing Information And GuYou’ve got that idea for a novel.

It bubbles inside you. Or you make that big decision: You’re “going to be” a writer. Trembling with exhilaration, you dial up your normal confidante. What a blast to share the news, you think, and how great to have the support of someone who loves you.

Now, just you wait a minute, there. You’ll find plenty of evidence that telling people about your goals makes you less likely to achieve them. (Derek Sivers: Keep your goals to yourself.) In your case – the case of a writer – this holds especially true. Particularly when you choose to share your zeitgeist with a non-writer. The field of writing has its own rules that take time to get to know, and the uninitiated commit sundry peccadilloes when advising a writer. Just a few of the most common:

  • They may advise you to chase an already crested trend. “No, no, you should write about a kid wizard or a school for vampires. That’s what’s hot now.” Trends currently on fire on the bookstore shelves (or already sizzling on TV or in the movies) passed muster with print editors years ago. These editors have moved on. This year’s books will provide the grist for popular movies 2-3 years down the road. Stick with your fresh idea, unless you learn from a relevant source that it may have a problem.
  • They often pooh-pooh ideas not identical to their conception. People hate appearing ignorant, and will advise and opine strongly in line with their preconceptions, sometimes on the flimsiest of grounds.
  • They have an oversimplified view of the publishing process, and may see one rejection as final. Yet they don’t see their own job applications that way.

 

Their pity may cement your new self-image as a failed writer.

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Your non-writer buddies may not appreciate that for example a novel or screenplay is a long-term undertaking, and ask about your project every time you see them in anticipation of some momentous news. They may shake their heads sadly or get a look of pity on their face when, after long months, you have still not published. Not a boost for your confidence. And if you do in fact get blocked, your non-writer friends will not understand. They may console you, but they won’t give you useful strategies or kick you in the pants and tell you to get back in the saddle. Their pity may cement your new self-image as a failed writer.

So many folks think that since they can write – sentences, paragraphs all nicely one after another – they could therefore write – that thing that a writer does – without the effort and commitment it takes in reality. If they put their minds to it, they suppose, they could take a few months or a year and spin off a novel much like the ones they are accustomed to reading. They will have a very flawed perception of your endeavors, and that perception could well rub off on you.

Find writer friends online and in real life. Join a writers’ critiquing group or start one. Get relevant advice. But with the non-writing world, play your cards close to your chest.

Permanent link to this article: http://goldenkeyscribes.com/blog/avoid-advice-from-non-writer-friends/

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