Category Archive: Getting published

MidSouth Christian Writers Conference 2017: Changing the World with Words

Writers Conference speaker

MidSouth Christian Writers Conference keynote speaker James Watkins

What: Christian Writers Conference
When: Mar 18, 2017
Where: Collierville First Baptist Church, 830 New Byhalia Rd, Collierville TN

Develop your writing skills with other Christians at the MidSouth Christian Writers Conference. Both advanced and beginner participants are welcome at the MidSouth Christian Writers Conference. Reap the rewards of one-on-one appointments with industry professionals and receive practical advice.

Program Focus:

Fiction, Humor, Marketing, Mystery, Non-fiction, Publishing, Religion, Romance

Take part in the following activities:

  • Keynote Session  – James Watkins
  • Three Workshop Session 1
  • Bookstore
  • Networking with other Christians inspired to write
  • Panel Discussions
  • Evaluations

Christian Writers Conference workshops:

  • John Burgette – Organizing Research Notes: Keep It Simple
  • Ramona Richards – Shoot the Deputy: How Secondary Characters Can Make or Break a Novel
  • Nancy Kay Grace – Toes in the Water: Getting Your Feet Wet in Blogging
  • Deborah MaloneMystery Writing 101
  • Andrew Breeden – Writing Devotionals for The Upper Room Magazine
  • Hallee Bridgeman – Seven Steps to Successful Self-Publishing
  • Johnnie Alexander & Patricia Bradley – Telling the Story: I Wrote It My Way
  • Jim Watkins – Writing with Banana Peels
  • Sandra Robbins – How to Combine Riveting Suspense with Heartwarming Romance

Keynote speaker: James Watkins

www.midsouthchristianwriters.com/

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10 tips for getting published

Draft Beer

This is the kind of draft you should be sharing with your friends.

1. Don’t give your draft to a friend to read. Friends are nice. They love you. That’s not what you need. Find other writers who need your genuine feedback and give you the same in return.

2. Cross genres. Love romance and mysteries? Love soaps and sci-fi? Mix ’em up and increase your creativity and your reader base!

3. Accept all feedback. This doesn’t mean you should actually follow all advice. But recognize it as a legitimate reaction. Get a thick skin. You’ll need it.

4. Learn to understand feedback laterally when necessary. Someone may advise you to pick up the pace, whereas in the end you may find that adding more detail does the trick, instead. Your reader was bored, but why?

5. Seek and destroy adverbs and adjectives. Take a hard look at each and ask yourself, “Can I avoid this adverb by using a better verb instead?” Can you rearrange your sentence to replace cruel with a good noun elsewhere, like cruelty or malice? A more detailed description may also do the trick. If you have written “He gave him a cruel kick,” relax. That will suffice for your first draft. But in your revision phase you might try something like, “He kicked him in the mouth, snapping his head back with a sound like ‘kretch.’”

6. Overcome your writer’s block by writing badly. Your inner critic can block you by making every new sentence seem like twaddle. See if you can churn out a huge volume, ignoring quality or even actively flipping it the bird. Keep on this way for the whole session. Come back to it on a different day, set aside for revision, after you have passed some benchmark, I hope, or completed a draft. Then slash and burn to whip it into shape. Revision will be easier when your original wording doesn’t hold you in chains. The more energy you invest in your first write-through, the less you will be willing to make the cuts and rewrites your draft needs. And how many creative gems shine through because you allowed yourself to cut loose! Self editing can be stifling after all. And your daily word count, obviously, will skyrocket.

If you can be discouraged from being a writer, then you were never a writer in the first place.

7. Knock ’em dead with your query. Lavish you query will the same attention you devote to the work it seeks to sell. Editors will always assume that a behind a dull query stands a dull book.

8. Check the acknowledgements of books you like for agents. Talk to agents at conferences and listen to their presentations. Get recommendations from others in the field to avoid scams and do-nothing agents.

9. If you don’t have a dossier full of killer clips, focus on newsbriefs – shorties of under five hundred words most magazines have alongside their longer, feature stories. Work up a portfolio of these before casting your eye on bigger game.

10. A lot of writer’s block is just laziness. Get back to it, day in, day out. Just because you didn’t produce yesterday is no reason for slacking today. If you can be discouraged from being a writer, then you were never a writer in the first place.

pencil tips

Ten useful tips

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How Do I Decide if I Need an Agent? Eight Tips to Help You Make Up Your Mind

crabby agent - still need an agent?

Can’t you see I’m busy!?

Agent or go solo? The pros and cons are many!

The tools for self publication grow more effective and more accepted every day.  Platforms like Kindle and social media such as Twitter give you the means to publish with low hassle, and to make your audience aware of it if you are savvy and assiduous enough. Should you jump in?  Or do you need an agent?

Our list below can help you set your head straight about the benefits of having an agent and of being a loner.

First, the “NEED AN AGENT” side:

      1.       The agent can help you overcome your own laziness.

New writers’ no. 1 mistake? Sending their work in before it is ready. A good agent will hector you ’til your book is all set. If necessary, the agent may have you spend months in revision. Sound tough? Many published writers who have gone along with this advice – while not sacrificing the core of their work – are glad they did.
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      2.       Agents have the editor’s ear.

Face it: your unagented manuscript may sit for any length of time in the slush pile before – in the face of an impossible workload – a junior, underpaid staff member opens it and stuffs it right into your SASE for return unread. Unfair? Bear in mind that a smaller publishing house like Dutton receives 3500 queries a year, and only about 1% of that slush pile measures up in terms of quality and market.
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      3.       Your agent can negotiate a better deal for you.

Unless you yourself are well positioned in the publishing biz – effectively qualifying you to be an agent – then you probably don’t know how much your book is worth or how much of an advance you can get away with asking for.
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There’s plenty to be said for having an agent – but let the buyer beware!


      4.       A good agent will navigate the labyrinth of a publishing contract in ways you can’t.

Myriad tricks and innocuous-seeming – but toxic – clauses await an inexperienced writer as she first dips her toes into the business side or writing.
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      5.       The agent can act as a referee between writer and editor.

A writer nervous about the purity of his first-born book may come off as a prima donna. Busy, disgruntled editors will look like tyrants. The agent will pass issues on in a diplomatic way.
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      6.       Coaching.

Good agents know the market and can powwow with you, nudging you towards which of the many projects you are keeping warms has, in his experience, more market potential.

Whew! That’s a long list. So what’s the question here? Well, many writers have had bad experiences with agents, too:Copyright©Goldenkeyscribes.com

      1.       Your agent may not do anything.

This is a much shorter list, but point no. 1 here is worth at least five above.  It is worth expanding upon. Children and young adult author Sandy Asher summed up her experiences:

 

An experienced agent took me on—and placed me in the very last stall of her very large stable of authors, some of them impressively rich and famous. She rarely visited my stall. She rarely answered my phone calls or my letters. … Looking back, I suppose her theory was that I showed promise and eventually I’d send her something she could easily sell. No hurry. When that time came, she’d trot me out to the starting gate.

In the meantime, I sent her manuscripts—revisions of Daughters of the Law and a string of those ever-hopeful picture books. As far as I know, she never submitted a single one of them to publishers. Two years passed. I grew so angry, frustrated, and sick at heart, I stopped writing. The woman was, for some of her clients, wildly successful, and for others, like me, toxic. I finally called her secretary and said, “Gather up everything you can find and mail it back to me. Whatever this relationship is, it’s over.”

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Obviously, Sandy’s agent – who just waited for Sandy to shine on her own – was the wrong choice for her.
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      2.       Agents don’t usually submit your work to small publishers.

The small advances offered by independent publishing houses – sometimes just a few thousand dollars – will amount to peanuts for your agent’s commission. She may not bother to approach those venues. However, a small publisher may be just the right fit you’re a novice. Naturally, your chances of getting a foot in the door are vastly greater with a Hungry indie publishing house.

So there’s plenty to be said for having an agent – but let the buyer beware! If you are saddled with a do-nothing agent, then give her the boot and go elsewhere to get the treatment you deserve.

And Sandy, above? She’s gone through six, and is mightily satisfied with her current one, Wendy Schmalz.

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8 Ways to Make Your Story Stand Out

Mile high stack of papers

Your manuscript has arrived!

Editors and agents see enough manuscripts in a day to make their heads spin, most of them with the same mistakes. If you want to forestall the “Not again!” reaction, follow these 8 steps to a more competitive story. 

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1. Make sure you base your story on some kind of action that propels it forward. This could be a problem that the protagonist encounters in the first scene, one that she works the entire length of your story to resolve. Sometimes even writers with a good publishing track record submit what are known as “walking around thinking stories,” which follow the protagonist from encounter to encounter, each one related to her problem in some way, but not bringing us any closer to the point where she solves it.
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2. Conversely, avoid the “macho hero story” in which your protagonist goes from climax to climax like Sylvester Stallone in Cobra. You will have a hard time making this kind of story seem fresh.
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3. In a similar vein, avoid repetitive profanity, sex and gore. If they are necessary for the story, then fine. But these, when not essential, will do nothing to hold the attention of weary and revulsed editors. Quite the opposite. Add alcohol, drugs and rape to the list. The writers of these tales (there are many!) realize they must avoid “walking around thinking stories.” But rather than turning heads, they will be turning stomachs.
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4. Sympathize with your characters, even in a comic novel. Too many agents meet sorry, unrealistic characters who fart, belch, scratch and pick their noses throughout the story. If we don’t feel for you protagonist at least, we will turn off and put your manuscript down.
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5. Persist. As science fiction great John Campbell said: “The reason 99% of all stories written are not bought by editors is very simple. Editors never buy manuscripts that are left on the closet shelf at home.” You can be absolutely sure your favorite author was rejected far more than you before the publication of her first book.
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6. Don’t just submit. Resubmit. Find the right home from the thousands available online and in print. Editors may reject a newcomer many times before letting him into the fold. Submit, rewrite, resubmit.
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7. Be yourself. Don’t just try to hit the hottest new fad in publication. Chances are prospective agents and editors are sick to death of it. Harlan Ellison put it this way:
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“Publishers want to take chances on books that will draw a clamor and some legitimate publicity. They want to publish controversial books. That their reasons are mercenary and yours may be lofty should not deter you.”
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They make money off of finding new things.
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8. Work on a strong ending. End your story in the right place. Does you ending focus on particulars and the tying up of loose ends? Or does it focus outward and help us see something greater? Is there an earlier point which would fill the bill? You may have to cut a few pages off the end of your tale.
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You can do it. Remember: the good news is, if you can avoid the mistakes that editors see 99 times out of 100, then you have a foot in the door. Make the best of it.

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