Category Archive: Infodumping

Avoid the info-dump debacle

dumpingWhat is an info dump and why should I avoid it?

info dump
(noun) : an often dry section of expository text in a work of fiction

“One of the perennial hurdles in science fiction and fantasy writing is overcoming the problem of the info dump.” —Keith Kisser, The Machine Of The World, 2008

The info dump often appears when a writer needs to convey something that happened before the starting point of the story, and can find no other way than to have the narrator throw it on us in one lump that gets stuck in our throats. Readers may skim through it, or lay the story aside, as the main action of the work stops until the dump ends.

For example?

Cherry lived in a small suburb west of New York, the kind where every house just mirrors its neighbor. Her mother and father had settled there with Cherry and her two sisters. Her father worked as an itinerant salesman and rarely spent time at home, which left Cherry yearning for attention, and blighted her love live, as she forever sought the approval of her man.

String the reader along. People like being in suspense, and it keeps them reading. The reader will get each key bit of information when they need it. Until then, keep them curious.

Her mother, a gentle, striking woman with a great sense of fashion and a nervous tic, worked as a cartoonist for the Grossmont County News, a local paper, which left Cherry with a love of graphic expression; but she always felt that in order to express herself in her work, she had to strike out on a different path. She had only one good friend in high school, one Debra Galloway, who later on became the victim of a rape. That’s why Cherry hated to go about at night–

Well…OK. But all that stuff could be important. I could fiddle with those sentences, upgrade the style and word choice–

You miss the point. Even if you can string some good sentences together, every paragraph should take the story forward a bit and still maintain suspense. Admit it. You kind of skimmed through the Cherry paragraph.

Well….

There, you see? You did. Not just because the style sucked. You were looking for the main event.

Just what kind of “info” are we talking about here?

The character’s background or personality, her society if she inhabits an exotic locale or faraway world. How magic or technology works.

I see. So, smarty-pants, how can I avoid this “info dumping”?

String the reader along. People like being in suspense, and it keeps them reading. Make sure the reader gets each key bit of information by the time they need it. Until then, keep them curious.

That’s pretty general.

Well, OK. Make your character’s dilemma clear in paragraph one, then carry the situation forward, develop and flesh out the dilemma. You could include each of the little facts about Cherry in our above example at the right point in the story – for example, she meets up with her mom and we discover with our own eyes, or a friend complains about his dad, prompting Cherry to do the same. Guarantee that each piece of information is relevant, make certain that its time has come, and anchor it in some way to that moment in the narrative.

Go through your manuscript and highlight all instances of telling, not showing, no matter how small. Ask yourself:

  • Do I need it beyond question? Can I cut it? Can I cut even part of it?
  • Can I show it instead?
  • Can I incorporate it into an existing scene where the information would surface more naturally?
  • Can I incorporate the information into a new scene, one which introduces the information in a way that does not stop the action, the flow of events?
  • Do I really, really need this info?

So maybe Cherry could meet her mom, talk to her on the phone, or have one of her cartoons on the wall?

Hey! Now you’re learning!

Oh, yeah, I was just so ignorant before you came along.

Sorry.

This all sounds like a lot of work.

It can be. Keep at it. Don’t give up. You’ll smile in the end, and your book will shine.

 

 

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