Monthly Archive: June 2015

Jun 28

Avoid the info-dump debacle

Don’t inundate your reader with information on the first page. Save it for later, or better yet, apportion each piece out at the appropriate moment.

What is an info dump and why should I avoid it?

info dump
(noun) : an often dry section of expository text in a work of fiction: “One of the perennial hurdles in science fiction and fantasy writing is overcoming the problem of the info dump.” —Keith Kisser, The Machine Of The World, 2008

The info dump often appears when a writer needs to convey something that happened before the starting point of the story, and can find no other way than to have the narrator throw it on us in one lump that gets stuck in our throats. Readers may skim through it, or lay the story aside, as the main action of the work stops until the dump ends.

For example?

Cherry lived in a small suburb west of New York, the kind where every house just mirrors its neighbor. Her mother and father had settled there with Cherry and her two sisters. Her father worked as an itinerant salesman and rarely spent time at home, which left Cherry yearning for attention, and blighted her love live, as she forever sought the approval of her man.

String the reader along. People like being in suspense, and it keeps them reading. The reader will get each key bit of information when they need it. Until then, keep them curious.

Her mother, a gentle, striking woman with a great sense of fashion and a nervous tic, worked as a cartoonist for the Grossmont County News, a local paper, which left Cherry with a love of graphic expression; but she always felt that in order to express herself in her work, she had to strike out on a different path. She had only one good friend in high school, one Debra Galloway, who later on became the victim of a rape. That’s why Cherry hated to go about at night–

Well…OK. But all that stuff could be important. I could fiddle with those sentences, upgrade the style and word choice–

You miss the point. Even if you can string some good sentences together, every paragraph should take the story forward a bit and still maintain suspense. Admit it. You kind of skimmed through the Cherry paragraph.


There, you see? You did. Not just because the style sucked. You were looking for the main event.

Just what kind of “info” are we talking about here?

The character’s background or personality, her society if she inhabits an exotic locale or faraway world. How magic or technology works.

I see. So, smarty-pants, how can I avoid this “info dumping”?

String the reader along. People like being in suspense, and it keeps them reading. Make sure the reader gets each key bit of information by the time they need it. Until then, keep them curious.

That’s pretty general.

Well, OK. Make your character’s dilemma clear in paragraph one, then carry the situation forward, develop and flesh out the dilemma. You could include each of the little facts about Cherry in our above example at the right point in the story – for example, she meets up with her mom and we discover with our own eyes, or a friend complains about his dad, prompting Cherry to do the same. Guarantee that each piece of information is relevant, make certain that its time has come, and anchor it in some way to that moment in the narrative.

Go through your manuscript and highlight all instances of telling, not showing, no matter how small. Ask yourself:

  • Do I need it beyond question? Can I cut it? Can I cut even part of it?
  • Can I show it instead?
  • Can I incorporate it into an existing scene where the information would surface more naturally?
  • Can I incorporate the information into a new scene, one which introduces the information in a way that does not stop the action, the flow of events?
  • Do I really, really need this info?

So maybe Cherry could meet her mom, talk to her on the phone, or have one of her cartoons on the wall?

Hey! Now you’re learning!

Oh, yeah, I was just so ignorant before you came along.


This all sounds like a lot of work.

It can be. Keep at it. Don’t give up. You’ll smile in the end, and your book will shine.



Jun 27

Lost Lit Writing Workshop

What: Poetry/Fiction/Creative Nonfiction Workshop
When: July 8, 2015, 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Where: Grumpy Bert, 82 Bond St., Brooklyn, NY 11217

Why: Designed in inspire writers of every level and genre and produce fresh, new writing in a “living room inspired space” using creative prompts and applying the Amherst Writers & Artists method, which treats all writing as fiction and only allows for positive, craft-oriented feedback. So instead of feeling lost, come find yourself through writing in a Lost Lit writing workshop.

This 8-week Session is underway. If you want to join after the June 17th start date, email for possible combo package discount.

Who: Lynne Connor earned an MFA in Creative Writing from Mills College. This AWA Affiliate is certified to lead workshops in the AWA method as described in Writing Alone & with Others by Pat Schneider, Oxford University Press.

Lost Lit Writing Workshops

Jun 21

The rules of writing

What are the rules of writing? Are there rules? Are rules made to be broken? Every writer lists the rules differently:

William Faulkner

I would say to get the character in your mind. Once he is in your mind, and he is right, and he’s true, then he does the work himself.

Martin Amis

  • You write the book you want to read. That’s my rule.
  • You have to have a huge appetite for solitude.

Zadie Smith

Work on a computer that is disconnected from the ­internet.

Scott Turow

I think that you must be aware of the existing conventions.  That does not mean that you cannot reinvent them in your own way.

Write first and always. Painting, music, friends, cinema, all these come afterwards.

~Henry Miller

Anne Rice

I don’t think there are any universal rules. I really don’t. We each make our own rules, and we stick to our rules and we abide by them, but you know rules are made to be broken. If any rule you hear from one writer doesn’t work for you, disregard it completely. Break it.

Andrew Motion

  • Decide when in the day (or night) it best suits you to write, and organize your life accordingly.
  • Think big and stay particular.

Kurt Vonnegut

Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them—in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

Neil Gaiman

The main rule of writing is that if you do it with enough assurance and confidence, you’re allowed to do whatever you like. So write your story as it needs to be written. I’m not sure that there are any other rules.

Henry Miller

Write first and always. Painting, music, friends, cinema, all these come afterwards.

Don’t worry even a little bit whether your book is on trend. All the trends will be trending differently by the time you get published, so it’s pointless to overthink it while you’re writing.

~Rainbow Rowell

George Orwell

  • Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.
  • Never use a long word where a short one will do.
  • If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.
  • Never use the passive where you can use the active.
  • Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.
  • Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.

Rainbow Rowell

Don’t worry even a little bit whether your book is on trend. All the trends will be trending differently by the time you get published, so it’s pointless to overthink it while you’re writing.

Joyce Carol Oates

Best tip for writers: not to listen to any silly tips for writers.

The rules of writing definitely exist. Everyone follows some rules, whether they admit it or not. These rules may differ for each writer, and some writers may not verbalize them, or even notice them. But every writer follows rules. Just examine his or her writing to see it.

If you feel a bit lost, have a look at the rules of others, and ask yourself: “What are my rules of writing?”