Category Archive: All advice articles

10 tips for getting published

This is the kind of draft you should be sharing with your friends.

1. Don’t give your draft to a friend to read. Friends are nice. They love you. That’s not what you need. Find other writers who need your genuine feedback and give you the same in return.

2. Cross genres. Love romance and mysteries? Love soaps and sci-fi? Mix ’em up and increase your creativity and your reader base!

3. Accept all feedback. This doesn’t mean you should actually follow all advice. But recognize it as a legitimate reaction. Get a thick skin. You’ll need it.

4. Learn to understand feedback laterally when necessary. Someone may advise you to pick up the pace, whereas in the end you may find that adding more detail does the trick, instead. Your reader was bored, but why?

5. Seek and destroy adverbs and adjectives. Take a hard look at each and ask yourself, “Can I avoid this adverb by using a better verb instead?” Can you rearrange your sentence to replace cruel with a good noun elsewhere, like cruelty or malice? A more detailed description may also do the trick. If you have written “He gave him a cruel kick,” relax. That will suffice for your first draft. But in your revision phase you might try something like, “He kicked him in the mouth, snapping his head back with a sound like ‘kretch.’”

6. Overcome your writer’s block by writing badly. Your inner critic can block you by making every new sentence seem like twaddle. See if you can churn out a huge volume, ignoring quality or even actively flipping it the bird. Keep on this way for the whole session. Come back to it on a different day, set aside for revision, after you have passed some benchmark, I hope, or completed a draft. Then slash and burn to whip it into shape. Revision will be easier when your original wording doesn’t hold you in chains. The more energy you invest in your first write-through, the less you will be willing to make the cuts and rewrites your draft needs. And how many creative gems shine through because you allowed yourself to cut loose! Self editing can be stifling after all. And your daily word count, obviously, will skyrocket.

If you can be discouraged from being a writer, then you were never a writer in the first place.

7. Knock ’em dead with your query. Lavish you query will the same attention you devote to the work it seeks to sell. Editors will always assume that a behind a dull query stands a dull book.

8. Check the acknowledgements of books you like for agents. Talk to agents at conferences and listen to their presentations. Get recommendations from others in the field to avoid scams and do-nothing agents.

9. If you don’t have a dossier full of killer clips, focus on newsbriefs – shorties of under five hundred words most magazines have alongside their longer, feature stories. Work up a portfolio of these before casting your eye on bigger game.

10. A lot of writer’s block is just laziness. Get back to it, day in, day out. Just because you didn’t produce yesterday is no reason for slacking today. If you can be discouraged from being a writer, then you were never a writer in the first place.

pencil tips

Ten useful tips

Make your flashback the best it can be

Back in time

Pulling off a flashback takes finesse. The danger of cliché looms large, and you may overlook other ways to accomplish the effect you are shooting for, explain your backstory or give us insight into your character. A flashback can disrupt the flow of your narrative, so exercise caution.

When faced with the questionshould I or shouldn’t I?” ask yourself:

  • Will the information I am about to impart by flashback come out regardless during the course of the story? If so, then leave it. Don’t be in a hurry to get it all out in the open on the first page. In fact, letting your readers piece it together for themselves will only heighten the suspense.
  • Does this flashback stem naturally from what flashes through my character’s thoughts? If the answer is yes, then chances are your flashback will seem a lot less contrived. Think of a trigger – a strong image or powerful event – that will bring your character’s memories to the surface.
  • Can I use some other, more immediate method to accomplish what I have in mind? As a replacement for the flashback, consider the “back flash” – in which crucial information emerges about your character in the present, preferably in the form of dialogue.

A flashback can disrupt the flow of your narrative, so exercise caution.

Mechanics:

When writing your flashback, beware the pluperfect. You may experience the temptation to narrate the entire flashback using “had” before every verb. Doing so will rob your flashback of power and immediacy. Just one or two at the beginning should do the trick, and, if necessary, one at the very end.

Consider:

Iris slammed on the brakes as Dixie, the neighbor’s kid, scooted in front of her bumper on her plastic motorbike. Heart pounding, she gripped the wheel to stop her hands from trembling. No bigger than her own little Sara had been when she had disappeared. It’d been an ordinary day at the mall when she had let the child out of her sight for just a moment. She and Pete had spent endless hours grilling the police, who had slowly given up as the months had rolled on. Pete had left her when, he had said, it had become an obsession. Now Sara was a statistic and Iris cleaned and maintained her room just as Sara left it, not knowing what she was hoping for.  

The sound of a car horn blaring jolted her from her reverie. She checked the road carefully and, unable to drive on, pulled over and covered her face in her hands. What if what they all said was true?

Here the writer (OK, it was me) leads us into the flashback with a trigger – the girl on her toy motorbike – but then has us slog through the tedium of repeated complex verb forms, reminding us over and over that, yup, it’s a flashback. This may be grammatically OK, but we never really let go of the “now” of the story, never get out of Iris’s car.

It reads more smoothly and seems more immediate without as many pluperfects:

Iris slammed on the brakes as Dixie, the neighbor’s kid, scooted in front of her bumper on her plastic motorbike. Heart pounding, she gripped the wheel to stop her hands from trembling. No bigger than her own little Sara when she had disappeared. It was an ordinary day at the mall when she let the child out of her sight for just a moment. She and Pete spent endless hours grilling the police, who slowly gave up as the months rolled on. Pete left her when, he said, it became an obsession. Now Sara was a statistic and Iris cleaned and maintained her room just as she left it, not knowing what she was hoping for.  

The sound of a car horn blaring jolted her from her reverie. She checked the road carefully and, unable to drive on, pulled over and covered her face in her hands. What if what they all said was true?

The passage is hardly perfect (a but showy and infodumpy) but is illustrates that  just one pluperfect fills the bill, instead of nine. Since I use the same trigger (traffic activity) to end the flashback, there is no need for even one more pluperfect at the end, to signal that the flashback is over. Without all the “hads” we can exit the “now” of Iris’s car and fully enter the past, and this effect only increases as the flashback gets longer.

Bottom line: Overall, make sure to incorporate flashbacks into you writing both rarely and well.

 

Back to the past and then back again. Time travel takes preparation. Like Marty McFly you’ve got to set things up just right.

 

How Do I Decide if I Need an Agent? Eight Tips to Help You Make Up Your Mind

Can’t you see I’m busy!?

Agent or go solo? The pros and cons are many!

The tools for self publication grow more effective and more accepted every day.  Platforms like Kindle and social media such as Twitter give you the means to publish with low hassle, and to make your audience aware of it if you are savvy and assiduous enough. Should you jump in?  Or do you need an agent?

Our list below can help you set your head straight about the benefits of having an agent and of being a loner.

First, the “NEED AN AGENT” side:

      1.       The agent can help you overcome your own laziness.

New writers’ no. 1 mistake? Sending their work in before it is ready. A good agent will hector you ’til your book is all set. If necessary, the agent may have you spend months in revision. Sound tough? Many published writers who have gone along with this advice – while not sacrificing the core of their work – are glad they did.

      2.       Agents have the editor’s ear.

Face it: your unagented manuscript may sit for any length of time in the slush pile before – in the face of an impossible workload – a junior, underpaid staff member opens it and stuffs it right into your SASE for return unread. Unfair? Bear in mind that a smaller publishing house like Dutton receives 3500 queries a year, and only about 1% of that slush pile measures up in terms of quality and market.

      3.       Your agent can negotiate a better deal for you.

Unless you yourself are well positioned in the publishing biz – effectively qualifying you to be an agent – then you probably don’t know how much your book is worth or how much of an advance you can get away with asking for.

There’s plenty to be said for having an agent – but let the buyer beware!


      4.       A good agent will navigate the labyrinth of a publishing contract in ways you can’t.

Myriad tricks and innocuous-seeming – but toxic – clauses await an inexperienced writer as she first dips her toes into the business side or writing.

      5.       The agent can act as a referee between writer and editor.

A writer nervous about the purity of his first-born book may come off as a prima donna. Busy, disgruntled editors will look like tyrants. The agent will pass issues on in a diplomatic way.

      6.       Coaching.

Good agents know the market and can powwow with you, nudging you towards which of the many projects you are keeping warms has, in his experience, more market potential.

Whew! That’s a long list. So what’s the question here? Well, many writers have had bad experiences with agents, too:

      1.       Your agent may not do anything.

This is a much shorter list, but point no. 1 here is worth at least five above.  It is worth expanding upon. Children and young adult author Sandy Asher summed up her experiences:

 

An experienced agent took me on—and placed me in the very last stall of her very large stable of authors, some of them impressively rich and famous. She rarely visited my stall. She rarely answered my phone calls or my letters. … Looking back, I suppose her theory was that I showed promise and eventually I’d send her something she could easily sell. No hurry. When that time came, she’d trot me out to the starting gate.

In the meantime, I sent her manuscripts—revisions of Daughters of the Law and a string of those ever-hopeful picture books. As far as I know, she never submitted a single one of them to publishers. Two years passed. I grew so angry, frustrated, and sick at heart, I stopped writing. The woman was, for some of her clients, wildly successful, and for others, like me, toxic. I finally called her secretary and said, “Gather up everything you can find and mail it back to me. Whatever this relationship is, it’s over.”

 
Obviously, Sandy’s agent – who just waited for Sandy to shine on her own – was the wrong choice for her.
 

      2.       Agents don’t usually submit your work to small publishers.

The small advances offered by independent publishing houses – sometimes just a few thousand dollars – will amount to peanuts for your agent’s commission. She may not bother to approach those venues. However, a small publisher may be just the right fit you’re a novice. Naturally, your chances of getting a foot in the door are vastly greater with a Hungry indie publishing house.

So there’s plenty to be said for having an agent – but let the buyer beware! If you are saddled with a do-nothing agent, then give her the boot and go elsewhere to get the treatment you deserve.

And Sandy, above? She’s gone through six, and is mightily satisfied with her current one, Wendy Schmalz.

New Author Speaks Out

“…the story wrote itself.”

Today Scribes takes you Salford, UK, to visit new author Debbie Hope, and talk about her first book, Lunar Regeneration. We found out she is a very busy woman!

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How would you describe yourself as a writer?
I write about the things that interest me. Once I had the intriguing idea about a regenerating skeleton the story wrote itself. Perfecting my English and editing took a lot longer and I am studying a BA in English to help perfect my skills.
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How would you describe your genre?
My genre is very much Young Adult/Fantasy with a little romance.
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How did you decide to self publish? Do you think there is a stigma associated with self publishing?
As a businesswoman, I have taken a businesslike approach to publishing my own work and I have no time for phrases like ‘vanity publishing.’ Journalists that use terms like that need to get with the times. I write for YA and talk to them direct through Twitter and reader sites like Goodreads. They would never dream of judging a work by the publisher’s logo. 
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Do you have any words of advice for anyone starting their first manuscript?
If you are just starting a novel my advice is to FINISH IT!
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How about some advice for anyone just having just finished their first manuscript?
Edit, edit, edit again. Then hire a free-lance editor (I used Anne Greenberg) and if you can’t afford a copy editor ask an English Teacher friend for help.
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If you are just starting a novel, my advice is to FINISH IT!

 

What is the absolutely most important thing you would like people to know about you?
My pen name ‘Hope’ is very important to me. I never give up hope.
 
What was your biggest help in writing your novel?
I love fantasy and never stop reading and that will always be important.
 
What was your biggest hindrance?
Time and life’s practical nuisances will always keep creeping up to delay the would-be writer. Set yourself a writing period and stick to it. Even if it has to be in the middle of the night to work in peace.
 
Tell us a little bit about your writing process.
I write in the late evenings when everything is done, including the ironing. Writing is my me-time, my reward; I work full-time, pursue an English degree in the evenings and have a family. Once I sit down to write, I am totally happy. I improvise when in full stream, and lost in the story, and I can write 2000 words a night.
 

Writing is my me-time, my reward. Once I sit down to write, I am totally happy.

 
However, editing for me is a slow and painful process, and I may only keep the best 200 of those 2000 words and will revise a thousand times. I always keep a copy of the first book in my The Immortal MacAbre series by me to encourage me to finish the next book. I love to Twitter to my readers but I don’t dare switch it on until my writing is finished for the night.
 
For the technical side, check the ‘about this book’ section on my website. I had no money to spend, but I did collect lots of advice and assistance along the way. If you are looking to self-publish, get your writing techniques and your work polished first. Then when you have something to promote make sure your precious budget is spent with the right people. I give technical talks on ‘how to self-publish’ for business networking groups because it is a skill you need to acquire.
 

Slamdunk Your POV and Move On!

Katherine noticed her reflection in the mirror. She gazed at her delicately arched eyebrows and observed her full lips. “Why–THAT’S ME!” she exclaimed.

See if you can find the mistake in the following lines:

“Hi! I’m John! Won’t you sit down? Hi! I’m John! Would you like a bite to eat? Hi! I’m John! Did you find your way here OK? Hi! I’m John!”

If you’re truly a sharp reader, you’ll notice that John is either what used to be called a broken record, or else suffers from truly short-term amnesia.

We would never put these utterances into the mouth of a character, but even experienced writers may find themselves introducing and reintroducing their point of view, alienating and boring the reader.

We writers often feel we must justify each observation our POV character makes. But once you establish your POV character, there’s no need to excuse every observation she makes with a she saw, she noticed or a she smelled. 

Of course, it is important to introduce us to the point of view of your story, novel or chapter at the opening bell to avoid confusion. Let’s take a typical beginning:

Rima looked out over the meadow, waiting for Drew’s return.

Great. We know this part of the tale will be from Rima’s perspective. Let’s see what happens next.

She watched as mariposas swayed in the breeze, running her hands over the rough wood of the railing Drew had built on their veranda. In the distance, she could see clouds as they threatened to block out the sun. She noticed a smudge against the horizon. She knew it must be a campfire. She wondered if there would be visitors at this time of year.

See how the writer (OK, it was me) reintroduces the POV in each sentence. What is happening in this description? Rima watched. Rima could see. Rima noticed. Rima knew. Rima wondered. OK! We get it! It’s Rima! We’re seeing this through her eyes!

We writers often feel it is somehow necessary to justify each observation our POV character makes, to show that she could realistically have observed it. However, once you have established your POV character, there is no need to excuse every observation she makes with a she saw, a she noticed or a she smelled. This is like old broken-record John, above, re-introducing himself at a party before each and every sentence. Nail the POV, and then make all observations (anything your character might reasonably know or perceive) without further preamble.

Rima looked out over the meadow, waiting for Drew’s return. Mariposas swayed in the breeze beyond the rough wood railing Drew built on their veranda. In the distance, clouds threatened to block out the sun. A smudge grew against the horizon–a campfire. Visitors at this time of year?

Mariposas swayed. Clouds threatened. A smudge grew.

Notice how much better a summary the main verbs of this paragraph make than the previous, “She watched, she saw, she noticed.” Snarky readers may point out that even more improvements could be made. Yet with this simple measure, we have trimmed the fat off our little description.

Speed bumps like the ones detailed here are fine for you first draft. Don’t get bogged down with revising before the first draft is ready!

 

You may grumble that the five senses are all important. But why say, “Randy could smell bacon cooking,” when we can say, “The smell of bacon drifted in from the kitchen”? If the sentence is about bacon, make that the subject! We can all guess that Randy smelled it.

This is what Fight Club author Chuck Palahniuk calls “the part where the character looks into a shiny mirror or teapot so they can describe themselves—all those hackneyed, obligatory 19th-century things.” I want to watch people doing things, not watch the character looking at someone doing something. And the revised version is truer to our natural flow of perceptions. I assure you, as I sit here, your faithful Scribe, I am absolutely not “watching my fingers fly effortlessly over the keyboard.” I’m typing.

Speed bumps like the ones detailed here are fine for you first draft. Don’t get bogged down with revising before the first draft is ready! But when it comes time for revision (after you write THE END on your first draft), take care to eliminate superfluous point-of-view elaborations that distance the reader from what is really happening.

A Writer’s Life

Today we talk with Rosemary Lynch, author and artist from Wiltshire, England. We asked her the trials and tribulations of the writing life and self publication.

 

When did you decide to become a writer? What made you do it?

I dabbled a bit when I was younger and then when my girls were small I wrote a few children’s stories about the animals on my parents’ farm.  The main bug kicked in about 2 1/2 years ago when I was off work due to an injury, and rooting about I found a chapter I written about five years ago.  I read though it and thought “Hey this is good! Did I really write that?”  Then that was it; I’ve been hooked ever since!

We all need feedback. Do you have a writer’s group?

I don’t have a writer’s group, but I join in as much as I can with forums and have my contact email on my website for feedback. I am fairly new to this, having only just released my first book, Kainan, so I’m learning about new ways to reach out to people every day.

What, for you, are the important steps of the writing process? Will you change anything the next time around?
 
For me it’s the whole enjoyment of writing.  Establishing the characters and giving them real personalities so the reader can empathize with them and feel their joy and pain. As I don’t have an agent yet, I am pretty much working at my own pace. I haven’t really changed anything with the book I am writing now, the sequel to Kainan.  I enjoy writing it – I have laughed and cried my way through.  Still not 100% sure where or how it will end, but that’s the excitement of writing each word, each page leads somewhere else.

            Writing is easy. Publicity is hard.


What’s your daily routine like?
 
I have a family and a part-time job.  On a normal day – if there is such a thing – I drop my youngest at breakfast club and get to work at 8 a.m., half an hour before I am due to start. I sit in the peace and quiet of my car, and I write.  Sometimes a page, or sometimes I can scribble down ideas for a chapter.  In fact, a large percentage of my third book which I have finished was written in my Mondeo!  Then family – walking the dogs, picking up my youngest, dinner for kids.  Then I have about two hours whilst they do what kids do.  So I blog, write, tweet.  Then cook dinner for hubby. 7:30-ish:  Collapse in living room with family, whack out the lap top whilst watching TV and write ‘til I can’t see anymore! Saturdays I write as much as I can, or I paint if the brain is not willing!

Do you have a daily word-production target? How often do you meet it?
 
I don’t work to a target! That would do my head in!  However, I do try and write something every day, even if it is only a few words.

What authors inspired you?
 
As a child I loved Enid Blyton and C.S. Lewis.  Now it’s people like Terry Goodkind and Terry Brooks.

How can fledgling authors hone their talent?
 
Read, and then read some more.  I spent a lot of time reading books that I both did and didn’t like, just to see how words are use to express feelings and actions.

How did you get the idea for Kainan?
 
It was on a trip up to Scotland to visit my parents. We were driving through the borders and I just had this idea for an epic fantasy as I looked out at the rolling hills.  My husband and I chatted about it, and he said, “What if you had this happen…?”  (I won’t tell you what – that would be a spoiler!) And I thought “Yeah, what a good idea.”  Scribbled it all down and then did nothing with it for years.  I reread the chapter I had written and had this mega-dream afterwards. It was like a movie playing in my head, and it just went on like that for months.

       The first time I held a copy in my hands, I cried.


Tell us a little about your journey to publication.
 
Initially I wrote Kainan just for my own pleasure – it was kind of like my baby!  My colleagues knew about it and started to nag at me that they wanted to read it.  I was reluctant at first, and to be honest, a bit embarrassed at it all.  Eventually I gave in and had 10 proof copies printed and sent out to willing volunteers to help me edit and proofread, by the time I had finished, it had been farmed out to their families, as well. I had such a good response that I decided to give it a go. I painted my own cover, as finances were short and that’s pretty much it. I would like to be taken on by an agent, as I find all the publicity side of it quite daunting.  My heart is in writing and telling the story.  I have had 100 books printed, which are available on my website, and the first time I held one I cried.  It was such an exciting moment as I am sure it is for all authors when they see their book in print for the first time.

What advice do you have for anyone looking to publish to Kindle?
 
I would say go for it, it’s free. The only problem is, it is very difficult at first to get the book noticed amongst the thousands that are on there. That’s why sites like this and the others out there are so helpful. You learn a lot from other people. It can become a bit addictive looking each morning to see if you have sold any, and disappointing if you haven’t.  Writing is easy, publicity is hard.
Find out more about Rose at http://www.rosemary-lynch.blogspot.com/

Pictures and Books

By Pamela Love

One of my book covers

Whenever people find out that I write children’s fiction, they immediately ask, “How do you find an illustrator?”  As a matter of fact, I don’t.  Nearly all publishers want to hire their own illustrators for the manuscripts they purchase.  Even if you do find your own illustrator, a publisher may love the manuscript, but not the illustrations, or vice versa.  They often just reject both to avoid trouble with an author or illustrator who begs them to use the other person’s work.  If you want to write picture books, send them in without illustrations, unless you can do them yourself at a professional level.  (Even then, be prepared to hear, “We want to buy the story or use you as an illustrator for someone else but we don’t want both.”)

In a way, all books are picture books—although in many cases, the pictures reside in the readers’ brains.  Especially for children’s books (and short stories), think of the illustrator.  What are you giving him or her to work with?  (Even if the reader is the one imagining it all.)  I don’t just mean adjectives, like black hair or dry leaves.  I’m talking about action.  If your story contains mostly dialogue, can you have the characters doing something while they talk?  Are they joking while standing in line?  Whispering backstage while waiting to make their entrance in a ballet?  Arguing while building a tree house?

      Make the picture in your readers’ minds a detailed one!

 

What if your characters don’t talk?  I have published books about non-talking animals and a short story about a child who was non-verbal.  In that case, movement and sound become even more critical. Think of all the ways your characters can move in their environment:  climbing, running, jumping, diving, swimming, digging, sliding, etc. Also, think of all the ways the environment can be moving, potentially affecting the character.  If you have two people just talking in a room, you might try making the scene less static by having a breeze come through a window and blowing one character’s hair, and she keeps moving it back behind her ear.  Meanwhile, the other person goes to the refrigerator to take out a soda—and maybe shuts the window on the way.  Possibly the refrigerator has only soda in it, or maybe someone spilled milk in it and hasn’t cleaned the shelf yet.  All these details make the scene more realistic. Make the picture in your readers’ minds a detailed one!

Launch a Description the way Anthony Burgess Does

Get inspiration from unexpected places

You have that new page shining empty in front of you. You feel that moment when an invisible hand grips your throat: “Gawd,” you gasp, “what will I ever write?”

If that’s you (or even if it’s not), try some exercises to loosen up the muses a bit.

Anthony Burgess, asked by a popular magazine about his writing rituals and methods, had this to say:

“I’ll tell you a thing that will shock you. What I often do nowadays when I have to, say, describe a room, is to take a page of a dictionary, any page at all, and see if with the words suggested by that one page in the dictionary I can build up a room, build up a scene. I even did it in a novel I wrote called MF. There’s a description of a hotel vestibule whose properties are derived from Page 167 in R.J. Wilkinson’s Malay-English Dictionary. Nobody has noticed. As most things in life are arbitrary anyway, you’re really doing what nature does. I do recommend it to young writers.”

 

That gave me a start, so of course I immediately ran for a dictionary. I found American Heritage too technical, with words like mescaline and metagalaxy, and settled on Macmillan English Dictionary for Advanced Learners, which I have here in front of me. The print is big, so I will use two pages, 1208-1209. I see words like responsibility, restraint, restrict and resting place. To me these suggest not only an idea for a setting, but for character, too.
Here goes!
Leonard had to take responsibility for his own desk. His mom would brook no excuses. Should she find a pencil or rubber band out of place, she would sweep everything to the floor with a flourish. He aligned his pencil cups, books and diary with the discipline of a soldier. He tried to keep these items to a minimum, to ensure himself a much-needed resting place for his elbows.
You could say my effort was a failure: I included only two of the words I selected. I would have included restraint, as well, but switched to discipline. However, a glance at these dry dictionary pages, seen in a new light with a new purpose, gave life to a setting and a character I didn’t know I had in me. The selection of words immediately brought to mind a tired, repressed individual, and I tried to bring that out in the description of his environment. This handful of lines will not be getting me a Pulitzer ever, but the exercise gave me a springboard and a direction with virtually no effort. And it’s fun. Try it!

Aim for money? Dream the dream?

Decisions, decisions…

How much to court fame and money, and how much to chase your dream?

We all face this question in our writing; we can choose a trendy topic, or we can go with our own fancy and see where it takes us.
Partly it comes down to an old saw oft repeated at writer’s workshops: write what you know. This tidbit of wisdom has taken fire lately from some writers, and often spurs fledgling authors to transcribe a bagatelle of personal experiences onto the page, hoping for the “write what you know magic” to produce a story. And if you aim at, say, science fiction, how can you write what you know, short of coming from outer space?
But in a sense, you are what you read. If you read westerns throughout your youth, then perhaps that genre is what you know. If it is romance, then that is what you know. Don’t forget, whatever sub-genre tops the trend heap right now will not necessarily do so by the time you finish your opus and pimp it around to several agents. Your work may provide the change of pace that editors will look for.
Nora Roberts had this to say:

“The most important thing is you can’t write what you wouldn’t read for pleasure. It’s a mistake to analyze the market thinking you can write whatever is hot. You can’t say you’re going to write romance when you don’t even like it. You need to write what you would read if you expect anybody else to read it.”

Naturally, we couch our queries in such a way as to highlight similar, successful works. But we also must demonstrate that we aim for a niche that now stands empty, and that our work in some way differs from anything else out there. And you can’t do that by cloning off the top hits.
So write what you know. You are, after all, an expert on books. Or you should be. If not, hit your local bookseller right away.

Write a Cascade!

The lines tumble down as if in a cascade

The cascade is a poetic form which can be fun and rewarding to write. It gives you some of the elbow room of free verse – there are no rhymes or required number of syllables per line – but each line of the first stanza repeats as the last line of the subsequent stanzas. Thus the first line of the poem will be the last line of the second stanza, the second line of the poem will be the last line of the third stanza, and so on. This lends some form to the verse, and provides a little challenge and creative stimulus for the poet.

The number of lines in the first stanza thus determines the number of stanzas in your whole poem. In a tercet scheme, the line arrangement would look like this: ABC, deA, fgB, hiC. For a quatrain, you would use ABCD, efgA, hijB, klmC, nopD.

Let’s have an example, the first cascade I ever wrote, to test the form:

The boy asks his father

the meaning of rain,

but the father does not listen.

 

The rain patters on the windowsill,

tickling the fantasy, when

the boy asks his father.

 

But the father is working, connecting the dots.

He’s not thinking about

the meaning of rain.

 

The drops call out to the open heart

and the flitting mind.

But the father does not listen.

 

Try writing one now; you’ll enjoy it! Feel free to submit your own cascades here on the blog.

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